Montreal and Mount Royal Canada about 1892

montreal-and-mount-royal-canada-about-1892

MONTREAL AND MOUNT ROYAL (CANADA)Montreal, the commercial metropolis of Canada, is a very attractive city, located on the best situation which the St. Lawrence River offers after Quebec. Its population is about 141,000, of whom 78,000 are of French descent. Of course the French language is very extensively used here. More than one-half the population of Montreal are Roman Catholics. The city is built upon a series of terraces which indicate beyond a doubt the former levels of the river. Its buildings are massive and frequently imposing, and its streets are finely paved. It was not until 1760 that the French power in Canada was finally destroyed by the surrender of Montreal. Since then, though its history has been comparatively uneventful, it has made great material progress in all directions. Still it is not by any means a monotonous and purely commercial town; for the variety here of different races, languages and religions gives to the place a certain rivalry of thought and interest which imparts zest and excitement to otherwise unimportant events. One of the principal features of Montreal is a long wooded ridge behind the city, 750 feet high and covering 430 acres. It is Mount Royal, and was purchased by the Municipal Government for a park in 1874. The view from this precipitous and shaded bluff is beautiful and very extensive, embracing in one direction level, cultivated plains and the distant Adirondack mountains, and in the other the city itself and the lovely valley of the St. Lawrence. The visitor may drive to the summit of Mt. Royal, or if inclined to test his muscles, he can walk either up long flights of steps which have been built to the very top, or along paths of easy grade. One singular feature of the mountain is a lake of wonderful clearness, which supplies holy water for the city’s catholic churches. (from John L. Stoddard, Glimpses of the world; a portfolio of photographs of the marvelous works of God and man – 1892)

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