Chevy Chase, Washington, D.C., USA about 1903

Chevy Chase, Washington, D.C., USA about 1903

Chevy Chase, Washington, D.C., USA about 1903

Chevy Chase (Washington D.C.) is one of the most beautiful as well as richly historic spots in our country. Over her fences, across her meadows, around her hospitable board, more famous men may be seen than in any other club devoted to the exhilarating sport of hunting. (from The Burr McIntosh monthly 1903)


Chevy Chase is a neighborhood in northwest Washington, D.C. It borders Chevy Chase, Maryland, a collection of similarly affluent neighborhoods.

The neighborhood is generally agreed to be bounded by Rock Creek Park on the east, Western Avenue (which divides D.C. and Maryland) and Tennyson Street on the north, and Reno Road to the west. Opinions differ on the southern boundary, where Chevy Chase meets Forest Hills, but many residents consider it to be Broad Branch Road between 32nd and 27th streets. The main roads leading in and out of Chevy Chase, D.C. are Connecticut Avenue, Nebraska Avenue, Reno Road, Military Road and Western Avenue.

In the late 1880s, then-Representative Francis G. Newlands of Nevada and his partners began the aggressive acquisition of farmland in northwest Washington, D.C. and southern Montgomery County, Maryland, for the purpose of developing a residential streetcar suburb. (See Washington streetcars.) They founded the Chevy Chase Land Company in 1890, and its eventual holdings are now known as this neighborhood and Chevy Chase, Maryland. Chevy Chase D.C. was developed beginning in the early 1900s after construction was completed on the Chevy Chase Line, a streetcar line stretching to and beyond the northwestern boundary of the District of Columbia, thereby linking the area to downtown. Over succeeding decades the formerly remote area was transformed from farmland and woods to middle-class housing. The housing stock in Chevy Chase D.C. includes many “Sears Catalog Homes”, a popular housing option in the early twentieth century that allowed individuals of modest means to order by mail the materials and instructions for a home and build it themselves. (from Wikipedia)




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